At the request of Turkmenistan, Pussy Riot member Aysoltan Niyazova was detained in Croatia

Aisoltan Niyazova , a member of the concert tour of the punk band Pussy Riot , who is originally from Turkmenistan, was detained in Croatia, Current Time reports .

The band is currently touring Europe with anti-war concerts and has already performed in Iceland, Germany, the Netherlands, Austria, Lithuania, Belgium and Slovenia. In Slovenia, Niyazova was detained for the first time - at the request of Turkmenistan, issued in the early 2000s. Having sorted out the situation (the criminal case had long been considered in court, and Niyazova served six years on it), the Slovenian authorities released her - and three days later Aysoltan was detained in Croatia, where she is now under arrest.

The publication reports that Aysoltan Niyazova (her relatives call her Aya) is a Russian activist originally from Turkmenistan. She met and became friends with Pussy Riot member Maria Alyokhina behind bars when Alyokhina, as well as Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Ekaterina Samutsevich , were arrested in a high-profile case of a “punk prayer” in the Cathedral of Christ the Savior. Niyazova was then in a pre-trial detention center on the "Turmen case" (it was investigated in Ashgabat and Moscow). Since then, Alyokhina and Niyazova have been out of prison for many years, both lived in Russia, helped political prisoners, and are now in Europe.

Aysoltan has a passport and she gets visas without any problems. At the moment, she has a German Schengen and a Swiss Loesse Pass.

The activists of the group said that the original warrant, which the authorities of Slovenia and Croatia referred to during these detentions, was issued 20 years ago - in 2002. Then Niyazova lived in Switzerland. The Turkmen authorities told Interpol that they are investigating the case of the kidnapping of about $40 million from the country's Central Bank and Niyazov is one of the suspects. In 2011, she was detained in Switzerland, but the country's authorities refused to extradite her to Turkmenistan, citing the fact that this country has not signed the European Convention on Human Rights and there are known cases of torture, kidnappings and political assassinations. Then Russia stepped in.

The criminal case on the "Turkmen millions" was investigated jointly by the authorities of Turkmenistan and Russia: according to their version, funds were withdrawn from the Central Bank of Turkmenistan through banks in Russia, including through the Index Bank, where the suspect worked. Switzerland agreed to extradite Niyazov to Russia, so she ended up in a pre-trial detention center in Moscow. Her minor son remained in Switzerland. According to Aysoltan, the case was fabricated and she had nothing to do with these millions.

In 2013, the Zamoskvoretsky Court in Moscow sentenced Niyazova to six years in prison. She was found guilty of money laundering and fraud, writes Current Time.

According to Niyazova, in Turkmenistan she is qualified as embezzlement from the Central Bank. However, embezzlement can be committed by an official, and she has never been in the Central Bank of Turkmenistan in her life. However, she still had to spend several years in a colony - but this term has already been served and, as far as she knows, no new case against Aysoltan has been initiated either in Russia or in Turkmenistan.

Pussy Riot found a lawyer for Aysoltan Niyazova in Zagreb - she is represented by Lina Budak . According to Budak, who managed to get an audience with the judge, Niyazova could spend up to 40 days behind bars while the authorities ask Turkmenistan for more information and find out if there are grounds for her extradition.

Despite the fact that extradition to Turkmenistan from European countries is unlikely (due to the state of human rights, as well as the European Convention not signed by her), there is no prohibition on extradition, the newspaper notes. In each specific case, the defense can apply to the ECHR and demand the application of Rule 39 - it prohibits the extradition of people to such countries until the case is considered by the Strasbourg Court itself.

Source: Chronicles of Turkmenistan